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Sunday, August 12, 2012

theTerrace up close



The terrace is located on the east side of the house off of the barn room. 
[No, the barn room is not finished, so please don't ask! :)  My part is done, but Dan has projects to complete as does my fabulous (and on her way to becoming famous, i.e. busy) seamstress who will sew the curtains. Nothing has changed in the room in four months. All I can say is you'll see it when you see it, and I have no idea when that will be . xx   ]
When we purchased the house the terrace didn't exist, well, technically half of it did.  Half of the current space was used as access to the barn door of the original livestock barn.   I'll do a post soon on the making of the terrace so you can see how it call came to be.  The terrace was initially completed last Spring; however, Hurricane Irene (last August) did some damage to the stone wall and it wasn't repaired until the middle of this past June.  It has only been in the last month that the terrace as fully come together.  My vision for it was that it would be a very monochromatic, natural space that blended in with the environment and looked and felt completely different than the other three porches that are attached to the farmhouse.  Right after it was completed a worker at the house told me he felt like he was on vacation when standing on the terrace.  Perfect.... that was exactly the feeling I was hoping for!   The three porches on the house are all covered, so this is the one space where we can sit at night and look up and see the whole star-filled sky (and shooting stars!)  We also have dinner here quite often.





We brought the vintage iron table base with us from Dallas.  It was a curb-side requisition.  In its previous life it was a trash can older!  After Dallas switched to the mandatory plastic rolling trash cans, people would place these old iron stands at the curb for our monthly "bulk trash collection." All I saw was "treasure!"  Dan and I knew the pick-up schedules for various neighborhoods and would go "junking" as we called it each month.  Oh, the finds we made!  One month (and it just happened to be a month I was redoing a bed in the backyard) we picked up a truck load (literally) of plants someone else had dug up and discarded for pick up.  We adopted them all.  I had a small collection of these iron bases  (Dan and I both love all things old iron;) but, sadly had to leave all but two when we moved here.  The other base is on the back porch with a piece of antique marble as its top.  Very recently we added a thick wood top to this base  using 3" planks taken from the barn during the renovation.  
The table is topped with a collection of items, all but one, brought with us from our last home.  A large (6-1/2 foot) antique green shutter that used to stand in our den in Texas holds court on the table (no, it is not attached to the wall).  It shares the space with an antique green glazed terracotta baluster from Singapore used as a candlestick, an antique concrete finial that used to sit at my front door, an antique lightning rod (part of another collection that graced my old cutting garden),  a white vintage garden pot and an industrial wire-container found here in New Hampshire that holds an asparagus fern.




Antique iron lightning rod with copper finial and antique amethyst and green glass globes.  I love how the colors in the lightening rod mimic the colors in the old shutter.




The weather vane on the rod is a gorgeous work of art, and this is only one of an accidental collection of vanes.  The pitted iron shows a century plus of weather.  I fell in love with my first weather vane not even knowing what it was.  I found it at an estate sale years ago and bought it because I thought it was a thing of beauty.  It has a red glass insert with a hand-etched star in the center.  Many antique vanes had colored glass in their tail.  I also have a vane with blue glass that was given to me by a complete stranger.  A man at one of our garage sales in Dallas noticed my collection in the cutting garden.  He said he was an antiques dealer and had a vane in storage that he would give to me when he found it.  I thought that was a nice thing to say, but honestly didn't think I would see him again.  Sure enough, about six months later he drove up and gave me the blue glass vane!  I was absolutely blown away by his kindness.   After that we would occasionally run into him at estate sales, so for months I carried a "thank you" note for him which I was finally able to deliver!
I surmise that the original glass broke on this vane and someone made a tin piece to take its place.




The arrow is puffy, not flat, which is an unusual detail.  Love the twisted center iron rod.




Vintage planter filled with Iresine "Purple Lady," again a hue found in the antique shutter.




Antique concrete weathered finial shows the passage of many years outdoors.




The french doors open into the barn room.  (We do have screens for the doors, but they reside in the basement.  We have such good air flow with the other windows in the room that we haven't found that we need them.) The old lantern light fixtures above the french doors are from a favorite shop, Nor'East Architectural Antiques in South Hampton, New Hampshire  (say hi to the owner, Donna, if you visit!)  We didn't alter the condition we found them in- peeling black paint over a solid brass frame.  The paint is slowly coming off from exposure to snow and rain and will one day be back to the original brass.  They are, of course, on dimmers! 
For scale, the french doors and transoms are just under ten feet tall.  The barn gray and white trim paint are both from California Paints and the colors can be found on my sidebar.  The chimney was done in a natural stucco- no tint was added.  That is an antique iron ash-removal door that you see under the table.




One of a pair of antique round beaded white-painted concrete finials share each side of the french door steps with one of a pair of antique iron urns filled with "Salmon" Geraniums, Dusty Miller, variegated Vinca and Soft Rush (Juncus effusus spiralis "Twister").  On this side a vintage Japanese fishing float and marble balls that were used in antique water filtration systems keep the urn company.




I  always knew that I didn't want to place flower pots on the top of the wall, but after several months of living with them au naturale I felt the wall needed a little something.  While sitting in the adiorndacks one night having a glass of wine I remembered the vintage iron farm equipment disk blades just sitting in the basement (everyone has a collection of vintage iron farm equipment disk blades, yes?!! :) and realized how perfectly they would look on the wall.   We had collected these over the years - I love "round" and I love rusty iron, so they were a natural collection for me.   They made the perfect planters as they have holes in the center.  I love their low profiles and industrial feel, and how the iron plays off of the stone and the softness of the greenery.   I was very skeptical about anything at all growing in them, but thought I would try my idea.  I purchased Miracle-Gro Moisture Control potting soil and Vinca minor (Myrtle Atropurpurea) and they have been happily growing for the last several months, even during stretches of 90 degree plus days!




To my delight, they also bloom this sweet little purple flower!




Large jardinieres from Home Goods are filled in the center with Ornamental Millet (Purple Majesty), Flamingo Feather (Celosia Spicata) and Explosion grass (I love this grass), and surrounded around the edge with green potato vine (Ipomoea "Goldfinger"), blue Scaevola ("Brilliant"), and Setcreasea ("Purple Queen").  Japanese fishing floats and copper balls are scattered around the terrace to add a bit of color, patina and whimsy.




These steps go to the kitchen mud room which is located between the kitchen and the barn room.  The vintage pot was purchased at an estate sale many years ago in Dallas.  Funny how things stick with you- I can perfectly describe the house and day when we found it, even though it was a good 15 years ago!  It is one of my very favorite pots.  Antique iron boot scraper on the left hand side of the photo was found at an antique shop in New Hampshire during the farmhouse renovation, and was set into the top step when these steps were added during the renovation.




The large stone next to the planter was "borrowed" on my last trip to the Tetons with my late father. Though you can't see it in the photo, it is a beautiful stone with large bands of white and gray;  I thought it was such a beautiful rock.  I was going to leave it, but my father talked my nephew, Forest, (who was young and fresh out of the Army - think strong)  into carrying it down the mountain for me! 
Thank you Forest!




Salmon Geraniums, blue Scaevola, variegated Vinca and white green-leaf Begonias share the pot. 




The wire form is from the dearly departed Smith and Hawken. 




Antique zinc dovecote.




Antique English watering can with copper sprinkler head.




 Close up of the copper "2"  indicating the can holds two gallons.




Antique French iron fence piece with its black peeling paint.




Door to the kitchen mud room and granite steps to the garage and drive below.




Iron urn at the french door.  I love the sculptural effect of the twisty Soft Rush.




The adirondack chairs have proven to be a great value!  They are still available at Home Depot for anyone interested.  ( We winter them in the basement.)  I often use the term "gravel" regarding the driveway, and terrace, but technically it is crushed stoneCrushed stone come from a rock quarry. The stone is dynamited, then crushed to different sizes. Gravel comes from a pond or a river. 
All the other crushed stone areas (driveway, side porch and cutting garden) are in gray stone, but here we used a tan stone that worked perfectly with the stone wall.  It is also a much smaller stone than the driveway or side porch area.  Black umbrella was used at a dining table on our terrace in Dallas.  It is now free-standing with its iron base buried in the stone.




The umbrella finial is a brass bird that started its life as an outdoor faucet handle.  The faucet eventually failed and had to be removed.  I thought the little bird would make the perfect finial for the umbrella!  He makes me very happy when I spy him perched up on top.




The antique granite steps were originally foundation to the barn and were removed during the making of the garage. 




Vintage Japanese fishing floats and copper balls .




Such gorgeous copper patina.




Close up of the jardinieres that flank the corners of the terrace.

  


The view to the north.  During Phase II of the barn renovation the stone wall (that originally only went to the middle of where the chimney now stands) was disassembled and moved approximately 12-feet over to make the new "terrace" space.  The additional large cut granite stones were place on the top to bring the height of the wall up to code.   




Pair of tables were "married" from items in my basement storage area (my area is decorative, as opposed to Dan's which is functional ;)  I just happened to have two antique English chimney pots and a pair (though  purchased separately and not matching) of vintage copper scalloped trays from India.  They sit on the chimney pots and do a fine job of acting as rain gauges!  I simply pour acquired water into the watering can to use later. 




Iron orb made from old whiskey barrel rings found at our local dump!  I used to also pick these up while junking in Dallas.  Recycling is good! 
(Tutorial here)




My sweet and beautiful photographer's assistant!! 



84 comments:

  1. I thoroughly enjoyed this post! I loved the background stories of all of your treasures. The terrace is simply decorated and very beautiful~

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  2. Every item in your home is always so well thought out. I learn so much from your vision each time I visit. Thanks for sharing - can't wait for the tutorial on the barrel rings.

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  3. I'm going to share this on my Facebook page so others who may not be familiar with your blog may see it. Hope that's okay.

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  4. So lovely, I am sure you spend many happy hours (no pun intended) on your terrace. Absolutely brillant using those blades for plants, I am so glad you shared those, I could not figure out what they were! And your table repurposed from the trash stand....once again so very clever. Can't wait for your tutorial on the orbs. Its always such a treat to read your posts!

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  5. Simply perfect!! xoxo! Brooke :)

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  6. Muy bello todo ,es una pena no poder entender el idioma.PAZ Y AMOR

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  7. Loved all your beautiful touches to the terrace. Looking forward to the tutorial. Have a wonderful Sunday.

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  8. Dimmers on the outside lights! Why haven't I thought of that before? You have a beautiful terrace, and I love that the most interesting pieces were found curbside.

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  9. Hi Joan,
    It came out beautiful!!! But everything you and Dan have done to your house is simple gorgeous!!! Would love to see it in person, but since I'm in California, that will only be a dream. You' have an amazing eye for decorating. Keep up the good work and please keep posting. Love reading your blog!!!
    :)

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  10. Thanks for sharing all the details of your lovely terrace. I love your French doors -- and your assistant! She's the best!
    Claudia

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  11. What a wonderful place you've created for Ella to relax in the sunshine. I enjoyed reading about every detail.

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  12. I'm loving and coveting so much here...it's all wonderful. I particularly love the vintage pots & finials...and the disk is pure genius, the vinca looks very happy in it...such a clever idea, as is using the moisture retention soil...that's a great tip!
    I mourn the loss of S & H very much and treasure my items from there...they were something special!
    Another beautiful 'room'...
    xo J~

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  13. Great post! I love how you tell the story of the items and how you "found" them...it is so great to hear your thoughts on the choices and the design process. I have a question about the crushed stone- I am assuming that it is different from the pea gravel as you mentioned, but do find it a problem as far as comfortable walking? I have a drive that was finished with crushed stone and it has always been difficult and uncomfortable to walk on so I was thinking of changing to the pea gravel. Did you make your choice to get a certain color or was there other reason/s? I also love your lightening rod! We have friends that have a collection of the old ones from barns in the midwest and it is so amazing, I am totally jealous! Isn't it fascinating how they would make such utilitarian objects so beautiful in the "old" days!
    Cheers!
    Meredith

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    1. hi Meredith, My stone is probably very similar to pea gravel in size. I walk on it, but I wouldn't exactly say it is comfortable;) without shoes on. I choose it for the color and because I really wanted it to feel different from the other parts of the house. The crushed stone on my side porch (gray) is smaller than the crushed stone (gray) on the drive. For our drive the "size" (3/4" crushed stone) was the determining factor since we plow in the winter, and something as small as pea would be difficult to plow. Plowing is a challenge because until the drive is frozen the plow will move the rock. For us the benefits (i.e. the way it looks) outweighed putting down black top.

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    2. Absolutely agree on the black top....one by one the houses around me here in Hollis have gone to black top, but I will never change from the stone/gravel look...I know it is difficult to clear in the winter, but it just looks so much better here in the country and I much prefer the natural look out here in the "country"! ;-)

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  14. Hi Joan - I always love these posts where you share your treasures and how you found them. Your terrace is so pretty and looks like a perfect place to enjoy being outside. I was wondering if you leave everything outside for most of the year? I have a few of the vintage floats and was curious as to how they handle the weather. Thanks!

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    1. hi Stacy, I do not. I bring them in usually in November. I will say that I left them out all year long in Texas, but I don't know how they would do with all the snow you and I both have.

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  15. Now that is what I call recycling! You are extremely creative and have a wonderful green thumb!

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  16. I am in love with the natural look of your lovely patio!

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  17. joan, must you torment me so? you have created a lovely space. I especially love your re-purposed trash can holders. donna

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  18. ..not often do words of a blog match the beauty of the photographs...but they always do here...blessings laney

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  19. such a gorgeous post...love the weather vane...thank you for sharing... xv

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  20. I really really like the colors, the pale green/greys/purples .. Ella looks lovely .. kiss her for me.

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  21. Farm equipment disc blades! Wow, you reuse materials so creatively! I love these, and will be keeping my eye out for the same type material for a granite wall I have! Thanks for sharing all the details. The little bird finial is the icing on the cake for the black umbrella!
    I also collect rocks from places that I visit, usually smaller than the one you have. I use them to decorate my outside planters. The weight limits on suitcases have mostly curtailed this collection though!
    Love your house and blog! Can't wait to see the barn room when it is finished!

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  22. Beautiful post, Joan. I alway love hearing the history of your items and how you found them.
    Don't you worry about the barn room. We all enjoy all of your posts, and the barn room will come together in its own time. Everyone should know that's how your style works. It's not forced. You let the items speak to you and the result is your gorgeous interiors.
    I must say, I'm definitely looking forward to the tutorial of the orb! I've always loved those!

    Hugs,
    Tim

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  23. OMG, your vision just amazes me. That is a TRUE talent that few have. You see such beauty that just blows me away. I wish you could fly to FL and give me some pointers.

    Carolyn/A Southerners Notebook

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  24. Your house is a perfect dream (from this side of the blog anyway!)!! THANK YOU for sharing!

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  25. You know just the other day I said "where are those vintage iron farm equipment disk blades" !!! LOL.... they look terrific! I've had good luck with the vinca minor coming back too...I toss them out back and in the spring they pop up again...I transplant them and I am happy!
    I love the weathervane- that is my favorite piece! The crushed stone looks wonderful. I wondered about the bird finial- that's so cute and what a great idea! Your rock story made me chuckle because we went out to Yellowstone and Mt. Rushmore and I made Dan stop at a little place along the road that had all sorts of rocks. Dan had to figure out where to put them to keep the load balanced! LOL.. I have a metal garbage can full of the pink quartz stones I made him buy....they lost their home around a fountain I had and I have been stubbornly storing them ever since!
    Love the copper trays... so much to enjoy!
    Miss Ella looks rather regal!

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    1. Lizabeth- I was thinking of transplanting right before winter and snow hit in the ground in hopes that they will come back for next year; so that is good to know.
      Pink quartz sound beatiful- hang on to them!

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  26. Wonderful post, Joan! I love reading where and how you found all of your treasures. Your terrace should be in a magazine!

    XO,
    Jane

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  27. Just spectacular! Your Adirondack chairs WERE indeed a bargain. I am tempted! Your rock wall is splendid...ever thought of adding a few suculents to the cracks and crevices?

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    1. LindaLime- No, but will note that in my garden book for next year! Thanks.

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    2. Vinca Minor comes back every year, like a weed. It can survive -35C and 4 ft snow in winter, and go on to survive drought and being under a shade tree in summer!
      You are very wise to keept it contained, like mint - it can take over!
      Your beautiful terrace, with stone walls and the 'gravel' gives the look of a 'stately home' - North American style of course, very much at peace in it's own surroundings.

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  28. My mother and father's home in Texas is filled with many of the same things I see you have. Especially the weather vane! One day my husband and I hope to have a home where we can enjoy these simple little pleasures in life as you do.
    Your neighbor to the northeast--(Maine)

    Elissa
    www.thetravelingpear.com

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  29. I knew there was a reason I saved those rusty rings off of some wine barrels. I am excited for your tutorial!!

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  30. Another beautiful space, Joan! I love all of the stories behind your treasures, and how you take long forgotten items and turn them into works of art. Were those glass orbs original to the lightening rod, or was that a "Joanification"? And looking at the open doorways to your barn room, I can't help but think about mosquitos and moths and other such bugs. We don't dare keep doors wide open like that at my house! Beautiful space!

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    1. hi Lana- The amethyst globe is an antique lightning rod globe, though not original to this particular lightning rod- I marry them to my liking; but the other was perhaps off of an old lamp? The Skeetervac does a really good job (most of the time;) of keeping the mosquitos at bay there. We don't leave those doors open for too long though as I worry about one of the little chippys that call the terrace home coming in.

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  31. Wow! You have so so many things! I love the granite and gravel. What a view and perch for star gazing. You are so very lucky.

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  32. Love. So natural, serene. What is a dovecote? Do you leave your marble slab table top on your upstairs porch out all winter? And do the iron legs rust? Do you oil them? Recently found a marble table top. Not sure if I want to try to move it every year back inside. Wonderful job. Sara

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    1. hi Sara- per Wikipedia... a dovecote is A dovecote or dovecot ( /ˈdʌvkɒt/) is a structure intended to house pigeons or doves. Dovecotes may be square or circular free-standing structures or built into the end of a house or barn. They generally contain pigeonholes for the birds to nest.[1] Pigeons and doves were an important food source historically in Western Europe and were kept for their eggs, flesh, and dung.[2] In Scotland the tradition is continued in modern urban areas.
      Yes, we do leave the marble slab table out year round. Even though that porch is covered it can easily have have several inches of snow of it at times. But considering all the marble architectural elements on antique buildings I think its okay. After the initial wire brush or steel wool that Dan does to iron pieces (depending on their condition) I then wipe them down with WD40. A trick I learned from a metal artist when I was in college. I used to do it once a year to all my outside iron pieces/tables that would sit out 24/7 in Dallas and it really stops the erosion of the iron.
      If your space isn't covered you can always cover your table with a piece of plywood then wrap a piece of burlap over it and wrap it so that it doesn't look bad to look at it- like they do on shrubs that need protection.

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  33. I don't even know where to start because I love it all!!! That table is awesome...what vision you have! I adore the lightning rod against the big chippy shutter. Your plant containers are inspired! Thank you for sharing these photos of your lovely space...

    Oh, and your assistant is a supermodel♥ So sweet...

    Linsey

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  34. Sublime! So enjoyed this post - you have a magical way of describing everything and always look forward to the details..including the bird final on the umbrella!

    I hope that you will publish a book someday (like Patina Style) that will include your fabulous script and photos and don't forget sweet Ella...

    NB in Ontario, Canada

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  35. I adore each and every detail about your terrace. Your home is always so beautiful, but to me, what makes your posts so special is the stories behind each of your treasures. It takes your home from one that is just beautiful, to one that is rich in personality and history. Thank you for sharing it with us =)

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  36. Just beautiful !!!!! Everything about your home is unreal ! have a great start to your week

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  37. Let me be the 57th person to say how much I love your terrace! Just perfection! I heard from a landscape designer that the cut gravel locks into place and doesn't move like pea gravel. It's on my list but one thing at a time!
    Well done, but we'd expect nothing less from you two!

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  38. And now that you've posted all the lovelies that make this terrace so inviting, I could just sit and dream. After a glass of wine of course.

    Your vinca in the blades is a perfect soft touch to the wall. We have vinca growing wild around our property we refer to it as "periwinkle" because of the flower color. It is so forgiving to the piles of snow that are shoveled onto it.
    Thanks for sharing

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  39. Those granite steps look great descending upon the carpet of green grass, a very resourceful way to reuse your foundations to the barn. The jardinieres also look fabulous surrounded by the fishing floats, an idea I might pinch! So many brilliant ideas.

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  40. Your terrace is just beautiful. I have a question about the french doors. You mentioned the screens were in the basement. Are they screen doors? Are they easy to put on and take off. I need screens on my doors in the summer, but don't like looking at them throughout the winter. I'd love to find a solution.

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    1. Catherine, They are still in the box;) but Dan says that they slide and would be able to be taken off seasonally.
      I bet you'll be able to find some/or have some made... good luck!

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  41. I noticed so many of the little details in the larger photos and wanted to know more...and so this is perfect for the "stalker" in me!! Such lovely details indeed!

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  42. ...oh dear...so anxious was i to read your post...that i pretty much skipped the first part in BOLD FACE PRINT...the sound you hear is my silently closing the french door to the barn room...and quietly waiting for my reveal invitation...manners are manners when you are reared in the south...(but i still pretty much cannot wait)...blessings laney

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    1. thank you sweet laney. I will swing the door open wide as soon as I can, I promise! xx

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  43. This is just gorgeous, every detail. I can imagine having a glass of wine out there while soaking it all up. Ah...heaven.
    Hugs~
    T

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  44. Joan,
    The space is lovely. I really like the natural stone walls you have in various places on the property. Your collection of wonderful, old rusty items is always my favorite part of this post. The weather vane is fabulous.
    Karen

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  45. Everything is so beautiful and I love your details post. I absolutely love the lighting rod. I wondered about the iron "baskets" by the chairs. One is larger that the other and it looks like they hold a candle. are there any details about them. they also look very interesting. best regards, wenda

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    1. hi Wenda! Go to the commentary above the second photo and click the highlighted "an industrial wire-container found here in New Hampshire" (there is also a small one on the table with the asparagus fern) and it will take you to the story of those iron baskets! Good eye!

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  46. Joan, every detail is wonderful and I love them all. But I do have two clear favorites. For some reason, the dovecote really grabbed me - I laughed out loud with delight when I saw it. Then there was that last photo of your sweet Ella. I can't think of a more perfect finishing touch for your lovely terrace.

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  47. I will wonder now if there are also "iron baskets" on the table in the barn room, but i can be patient. Your talent is amazing. Of all the decore things you can find on the internet, yours is always my favorite down to every last detail. Have a wonderful evening on this lovely terrace. Wenda

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    1. Thank you Wenda! No iron baskets in the barn room- they all made it out to the terrace;)

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  48. An umbrella finial?!?! Now THAT is special! And I adore birds, so I love it even more because it's a bird. I think when I see finials I will always think of you!

    The more I see of your house, the more I love it. So well done at every turn.

    xo,
    Linsey

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  49. Sorry for the late comment, but I wanted time to properly appreciate this post. Every photo and idea is magnificent. One question--I love all the weathered metal, but don't you have problems with staining from all that iron and copper?
    --Road to Parnassus

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    1. Sir P, You're not late at all! I don't find any staining with either the iron or copper (I've not seen copper stain honestly). And the only time I've had the iron stain is leaning an iron peice on the painted white wood shingles of the farmhouse. In Dallas, where I would leave all my outdoor things out all year long, I would once a year coat all my iron table bases (all the iron tables now reside on the covered porches) with WD-40 to prevent rust and corrosion. You simply spray it on and wipe the excess off with a paper towel. It was a tip I learned from a metal artist when I was in college and it does a great job.

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  50. Love the console table. It looks wonderful outside and I would love it inside also.

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  51. So gorgeous! I love how you put everything together and it looks so effortless.

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  52. Joan,
    You are so talented...because you make everything seem so relaxed, easy and evolved. Had to laugh about the "trash carrier" find from Dallas! Love that you have rescued and saved so many things and found new homes and uses for them. I need to purge a little less, I think!

    Your vinca minor made me smile. I have it growing in between stepping stones at my new side entrance and everyone loves it. I need to photograph and share that, I think. It's such a nice change from just having grass grow in between.

    The Japanese floats reminded me of the Chihuly exhibit we just saw in Dallas at the Arboretum. He was inspired by them and created an installation in a boat that overlooks White Rock Lake. One of my favorite in the exhibit.

    And, gotta love that photographer's assistant!!
    xoxo Elizabeth

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  53. Joan, Dan, and Ella: I have looked at this post several times and have yet to comment. I am speechless (and that never happens) over the beauty of the area. Cindy

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  54. your attention to detail really keeps me on my toes joan. wow. this is such a beautiful space. i hope one day to sit there and sip a glass of wine with you:) xo janet

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  55. As is everything you do, the patio is an absolute masterpiece. It's perfection.
    xoTrina

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  56. wow - i remember when there was nothing there! unbelievable. it is gorgeous!!!!!!!!!!!! love the gravel. just fabulous!

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  57. EVery detail perfect, Joan, right down to sweet Ella! I love the soft rush, too and use it as often as possible in my containers. Beautiful space, thank you so much for sharing!
    xo Heidi

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  58. I love the terrace! I am a landscape architect in the Boston area and was asked to do a design for a farmhouse in NH. The have a great deal of old granite slabs that I would love to reuse on the property. I had thought of a gravel terrace surrounded by the stone walls. Is it possible to talk with you about the construction of the terrace?
    thank you! elizabeth ahmgem@gmail.com

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    1. hi Elizabeth- Of course! You can contact me at fortheloveofahouse@comcast.net

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  59. Could you tell me is the lightening rod attached to something heavy in order to keep it upright? I have one off of my 94 year old house that I would like to use as yard art, but I can't figure out how to keep it in/on the ground so that I don't risk it falling over and breaking the glass globe. Can you advise?

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    1. Yes, the lightening rod is attached to a round, concrete stepping stone. (You can see it if you look closely in the photos.) I found an old-looking grey one. It has a hole in the center which I believe Dan drilled out so the center rod could go through. Each of the three support legs is then attached with concrete screws to the outside (as opposed to the top surface) of the stone.
      How lucky to have one from your own house!

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  60. I live in Southern NH as well and was wondering if you would be willing to share with me the source for your "gravel" on the terrace- it is exactly what I am looking for!!

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    1. hi Tineka, the crushed stone (aka gravel) came from Pike Industries in Wilton. It had the best grey color we could find. But stone colors change depending on what they are crushing. Good luck finding your stone.

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