IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO STAY CONNECTED BETWEEN POSTS FOLLOW ME ON
Instagram (fortheloveofahouse) !

Saturday, June 15, 2013

the barn room: details



Welcome to the barn room!
First, thank you so much for all of your wonderful comments.  I am blown-away and extremely touched by your kind words.  Thank you.

(I have tried to include answers to your questions about the room in this post)
I thought it might be helpful to start with some reference points for scale:  
the room measures 23 x 27 feet and the ceiling is 12-1/2 feet in height;
the french doors measure almost 10 feet to the top of the header; 
the height at the top of the mantel is 6-1/2 feet.


The barn room walls are covered in ship-lap random width pine boards.  This room (including baseboards) is painted Benjamin Moore's Sea Haze 2137-50.  When choosing the color for the barn room I tried really hard to not look at the color names.  I can be easily swayed by a good name;)  I kept coming back to one swatch, and after finally identifying it as Sea Haze I realized it is the next color on the wheel from Gray Owl which is in the adjacent kitchen.  At that I knew it was the one!  It is a blue/green/grey which changes throughout the day and also varies depending on the season.  The ceilings are white washed pine boards.  





This antique herbarium is possibly my favorite of all our collections! (more on them further down this post)  
Antique iron gates are from Argentina and were found at a local antiques shop several years before the barn renovation began. The gated doorway leads into the barn mud room.
After living in the room for several months I decided I wanted an old pharmacy lamp next to the sofa.  If you have ever looked for an original, old one you know they are impossible to find.  So,  I began to look for new reproductions, but you know me;)  I really wanted something old.  Several months into my fruitless search (online, at antique shops, etc.) we woke up one weekend morning and Dan tells me he thinks we need to go antiquing as he has a feeling we are going to find something!  Later that day "he" found this old, adjustable height brass pharmacy lamp at a shop in Rhode Island. When he found it it was reduced to its smallest height adjustment, about 3 feet.  When I caught up to him he proudly showed me his find.  I told him I loved it, but it was way too short;)  He extended the arm of the lamp to its actual height and it was perfect!  I was one very happy girl!  It must have been fate as the patina of the lamp almost perfectly matches the coppery brown in the herbaria behind it.  When we got it home and began to re-wire it we found a plate on the inside marking it as "Western Electric" brand, and after some research I found it to be approximately circa 1915. 
Faux fur throws (bear, I believe) are a favorite with all of us in the cold New England winters, but especially with Ella- I think she thinks it is her 'birth' mama;)  She misses them when I put them away for the summer.





The chandelier is is just over 4 feet wide and was a wonderful Craigslist find- its story here and here.
The thick, textured jute rug measures 13 x 15' (which is an extremely difficult size to find at an affordable price point) and was a fabulous value from here.  Though I had to wait several months while it was on back-order the rug is wonderful and was worth the wait!  I love the texture that it provides the room.  It is also very soft and comfortable to bare feet.
    





The clamshell is real and measures 37" wide!  It was sitting in the front yard of a 1950's ranch-style house in our neighborhood in Dallas.  I would notice it every time I drove to the grocery store and coveted it for several years.  One day I drove by and the house was for sale.  I went home and wrote a letter to the homeowner asking if they would be interested in selling it.  No response.  I then noticed the house seemed to be vacant.  At this point I start to panic!  Several weeks went by with still no reply, so I called the agent listing the house.  She told me the house was in probate and forwarded my interest in the clamshell to the trustee of the estate.  Within hours I got a call from the man's secretary.  She asked me what I would like to offer.  I had no idea, but explained that several months before I had purchased a smaller one (the one on the shelves that Dan built in the master bath) and I paid $50 for it, so I offered $75 for this one (now, here you must understand I had never actually seen the piece up close, only from the street and had no idea of its condition or true size.)  The offer was accepted!  I then RAN to find Dan and told him we needed to go get the shell immediately before the man changed his mind!   We drove to the house and it was then that I realized the shell was not just big, it was huge!  It weighs a good 200+ pounds!   Dan looks at me and tells me that there's no way I can help him pick it up.  I'm wearing boots at the time that have a 2.5" heel- not the best heavy-lifting accessory;)  I look at him with the determination of a woman facing losing her coveted object and say "Ohhh Yes I can!  And hurry!"  I was worried the neighbors would think we were stealing it and wanted to get out of there quick!  Dan was shocked as I easily helped him load the shell into the back of our Yukon- it took up almost the entire width of the back, and unloaded it at our house.  When we moved from Dallas a special crate was built to house the shell.  When we moved into the farmhouse the crate remained in the basement until we moved into the barn room.  We hired one of our young, strong carpenters to help us move into the room.  He brought along an even younger high school football player- think big and muscular; this boy was a rock.   And, you should have heard him huff and puff as they carried the shell up from the basement.  Of course I had to mention how I had helped Dan move it wearing 2.5 inch heels:)!





Yes, the man-t.v (a 65" flatscreen) was Dan's idea, but honestly, the day it was installed it was me who was questioning if it was large enough:)
The floors are white pine and are 12" wide.





Antique painted-iron finial is from a building in downtown Portland, Oregon. Our neighborhood there (Eastmoreland) would have an annual yard sale; this was back in the early 90's when architectural antiques were just coming on the market and were very expensive.  I asked the sweet, elderly lady how much the iron piece was and she told me "seven fifty."  I said thank you and walked away not surprised by the expensive price.  In telling Dan of the price I realized that maybe she didn't mean $750 as I had assumed, but seven dollars and 50 cents??  No, couldn't be.  So, I asked again "Excuse me, how much did you say this was?" and sure enough this time she said "seven dollars and fifty cents!"   She told us her husband used to work for the city and it was being thrown out during the renovation of an old building in downtown, so he brought it home.  It sits on an antique wood base that we found in Montgomery, Alabama. 
I adore this pair of lamps that we made from antique wooden balusters... a story about the them can be found here.
The table is vintage.  
The huge basket, filled with magazines, was a roadside requisition rescued from a bulk-trash pile back in Dallas!  People used to throw out the best things! 





The original barn door used as art.  The door is 11 feet tall by 11-1/2 feet wide.  This is the door that Dan and I would slowly open and close (it's extremely heavy) when we would come over to see the house while we were trying to talk ourselves into buying it.  The house was empty and visiting realtors would accidentally leave the barn to house door unlocked on occasion, and we would come inside and try to imagine what it would "feel" like to live here without anyone else around.  We would come over during the day and late at night to see if the house felt safe and happy.  It did!  While we were renovating the room I planned to oil/wax the door, but after installation (here) I realized that all it needed was a good vacuuming and it was perfect in its rough-hewn condition.
The table under the barn door is an old iron work table base.  The table is 8 feet in length.  We added a slab of soapstone as its top.  The large antique iron urn is from Jackson, Mississippi- which is where my late father was from;  I like knowing that this urn was across town as my father was growing up.  Collection of antique blue and white Chinese porcelain pieces (including the lamp) share the table corner.  Antique rug sits in front of the work table.





In this photo you can see the oil painting in the barn half bath and how that space relates to the barn room. Sofas are slipcovered in natural linen.  Custom down cushions in brown velvet and accent cushions in a latte jacquard and coral velvet.   The coral/salmon/pink-orange color can be seen in several of the rugs in the room and on the large cushion on the opposing sofa.  It is a color that I absolutely adore.  Both sofas were custom, made in Dallas.  The sofas were dissimilar and were in different rooms in that house.  Covering them with the same slipcover design and fabric has brought them together here.  I designed the slips to have box pleats and they were made "on site" by an amazing seamstress.  It was wonderful to have her make them on-site as we could discuss every little nip and tuck along the way, getting each and every detail exactly as I envisioned.





Same view as the photo above, only vertically.  I thought showing both views would give you a better feel for the space.  A while after we moved into the room I decided I wanted a table in front of the sofa facing the fireplace.  I wanted/needed a place to stack magazines for reading, to set a drink, or just to prop your feet up on to watch a show.  I envisioned a "pair" of something.  I looked for months, finding some great options along the way, but not "the one."  When I found these vintage iron nesting garden tables at an antique shop I thought they would be the perfect answer!  I love the element of metal they provide in the room and how easy they are to move around (they have glides under their feet that easily slide across the thick weave of the rug);  I loved that they weren't the same height which offered interest, and I also love that they are not solid- the pierced iron gives a nice pattern to the room and doesn't compete with the coffee table.  They were covered in flaky rust when I found them and Dan wire brushed and oiled them into the beauties they are today!





This photograph shows the other french door flanking the fireplace.





Antique Victorian table was painted black probably 100 years ago- it has a wonderful alligatored finish that comes with age.  Leather chair (they were purchased 12 years ago and yes, they recline) with faux fur throw and a raw silk pillow.
The large, old, weathered barrel-top basket sits under one of the windows that flank the television.  When I found the basket at a favorite antique mall the dealer happened to be in the booth.  I looked at the price and not having my reading glasses with me;) I didn't believe my eyes- I think it was $22.  So, I went back to "casually" look at the price several more times, trying to figure out if I was seeing it correctly.  The dealer must have thought I was thinking the price was too high as every time I looked at it she said "I can take $2 off that price", but really I was just trying to see! I think I ended up paying $18 for it.
It's difficult to get the full scale of the room from the photographs, but the windows flanking the television measure 6 feet wide by over 5 feet tall.
Oops....I see the photographer left her glass of wine in this photo;) 





Moose antler sits on the antique French commode that we found at the Scott Antique Market in Atlanta years ago.  I bought it as the dealer was literally wheeling it off the truck as I didn't want it to get snapped up when its feet hit the ground. If you've ever been to Scotts, you know if you blink twice someone else will swoop in and buy the piece you're thinking about!   Love the simple carving on the piece.  The commode is unusually large, standing at 55-1/2 inches tall.  The man-speakers had a little silver "P" on each of the three speakers - I painted them mat black... don't tell Dan;)!





Large antique Chinese brass bowl was purchased a good 25 years ago and has lived in all my houses, though it stayed in a cabinet during my "I hate brass" phase... thank goodness that's over!  





Antique iron martini table.  I've seen lots of reproductions of this table, but was thrilled to find an original.  It was completely covered in thick rust.   Dan wire brushed (using a wire-wheel brush attachment on his drill) and oiled (3-in-1 oil and buff with paper towels) the table. Adore the pitted top!  And yes, it has been known to host a dirty martini or two;)  and an occasional glass of wine (see above photo;)   Patina on the leather chairs courtesy of Ella as they are a favorite of hers!   Brown velvet cushion, and antique cushion and rug with coral accents.





I honestly don't think we could have found a more perfect antique coffee table for the room.  The hand painted, marble topped Empire table is circa 19th century and is really a piece of art.  The room and furnishings all have very simple lines, and I love how the table is ornate and commands the center of the room.
We found it at the fabulous Withington Antiques in York,Maine. (hurry, my friend Steve at Urban Cottage just told me they are closing in November and I am heartbroken.)  Dan and I saw it at the same moment then looked at each other with the "that's the one" look!  We were driving my car which couldn't accommodate the table, so we left it to pick up later.  We came home and I measured the table size in the room and PANICKED.  I thought it was going to be way too small.  I drove myself crazy for weeks worrying about the table.  But, once we walked it into the room it couldn't have been more perfect in size and scale and design!   Closeup photographs of the table here.





The table has a beautiful, moody dark grey marble top.  It is the perfect (think low-maintenance) surface to set a drink.  It is also the perfect height to prop your feet up on. I really can't tell you how much I love this table! 





The large piece of granite (finished size is 6.5 foot x 20 inch)  that we used for our hearth stone was original to the barn and was removed during the making of the garage.  The story of crafting of the 769-pound hearthstone is here.  
The fireplace is stucco over brick and cinder block.  You can see the process of it being built here.
I was asked what my inspiration for the fireplace was.  I wanted the room to have an open, airy/light feel to it, like the old European country houses you see as opposed to it feeling lodge-like or barn-like (the rest of the barn is more "barn-like".)   I didn't want to put in the massive stone fireplace one sees often in New England; while they can be beautiful I felt that in this room and the way it is entered it would take up all the energy of the space and draw all the attention. I wanted something lighter in look and feel, yet something that could hold it's own with all the other large elements of the room (i.e. the 9 foot french doors, the 11 foot barn door, etc.).  Dan had always envisioned a stone fireplace, but after showing him some great photographs of stucco fireplaces he understood the direction I wanted to take the room.  It didn't hurt that we went ahead and got a quote for a stone fireplace and it was between $50-$70k!  We knew it was the right choice for this room when realizing that even if we had the budget (we didn't;) to put a stone fireplace in, we wouldn't!
Since the fireplace is in direct line of sight as you come down the stairs from the kitchen I designed the mantel to wrap the chimney (as opposed to only being on the face side), so that you saw that element of wood as you walk down the stairs.  It also gave the chimney a bit more visual weight in the room.  The mantel is a beam that was also original to the barn.  Our lead carpenter did a masterful job of getting the old beam (that had aged with twists and turns over the century and a half since it was originally placed in the barn) to level.
The arch of the firebox was a very important detail for me.  I find it is so interesting that depending on the angle of a particular arch it can read either contemporary, or old.  I looked to the subtle arch in the living room fireplace and tried to mimic that for this space.  The angle of the chimney was another extremely important element for me.  One inch, one way or another, made the chimney "read" totally different.
An antique English dolly tub holds firewood.   The antique iron poker (in the tub with the wood) is the only fireplace tool we use.  Antique glazed terracotta corbel can stand the heat of the fire.   Fireplace screen is vintage and the antique brass andirons are Federal in style.
The painting is by a listed, turn-of-the-century artist who retired to our small town.  Our area in New Hampshire was (and is) very popular with artists because of its natural beauty and the amazing light we get.  After randomly googling his name one day several years ago I found this painting in an auction from a museum in Wales which was decommissioning works bestowed to it. I loved the subject of the painting, the colors and I thought it would be perfect for the mantel.  Thankfully we won the auction!  The painting reminds me of  places we have visited in Europe (where the artist often traveled to paint) and also of New Hampshire. The really special part of this story is that I know the house where the artist lived!  My friend/neighbor lives in the house.  I love the connection, and love the painting even more.





There are birds flying on the horizon in the painting and I love how the little bronze birds on the mantel look like they could have flown right off the canvas and landed in the barn room!  
The bronze and crystal sconces are antiques.  They were not electrified when I found them, so Dan wired them for electricity.   I positioned them on the wall and our electrician rough-wired for the sconces,  then the walls were entirely covered with the pine boards and painted.  We took many measurements, but I was still nervous, when months later, he went to drill small holes (notice how narrow the back plates of the sconces are) through the wood and fish out the wiring.  Our wonderful electrician made it look like a piece of cake and found both wires easily.  It was a very good day!
The sconces (as does the chandelier) have real-wax candle covers.  Close up photos here.





This antique rug is at the base of the stairs coming down from the kitchen.  






Antique French wine tasting table.  
The large demi-john lamp was found in Maine and has an antique brass finial we made from a grandfather's clock finial.  The decorative iron piece is from a widows-walk off an antique house.  The carved white wood base was found at an antique shop and we married the two pieces.
Antique Chinese blue and white double happiness temple jar is one of a pair- its mate is on the work table under the barn door.  Pair of wood candlesticks shares the table with a white wood corbel on top of a stack of books, a vintage oil painting, mercury glass-type candle holders and a vintage leather dice cup which holds antique dice. (I've always loved Yahtzee, and find rolling dice trying to get all "sixes," relaxing;)   Look closely and you'll see a horizontal line in the wall boards to the right of the herbarium.  That is the hidden electronics cabinet that houses all of the tv/stereo equipment.  It opens using a push clasp. All of our electronic equipment uses radio frequency (as opposed to infrared) which enables the door to remain closed during use since the signal goes directly through the door.





The table also holds this vintage photo.... this is Rex- my father's childhood dog.  My father was the second youngest of 11 children and grew up Mississippi during the depression.  His mother died when he was only 15, and he went to live with an older sister in Texas while his younger brother went to live with another older sibling.  I have heartbreaking letters from him where he wrote to a sister about how much he missed everyone being together and especially missed his dog Rex, who stayed in Mississippi.  You've seen my collection of old dog photographs in the reading room, but this one, of course, is my favorite.





Herbarium  (50 different specimens) is American and they were made by Lulu M. Cowan in 1894.
 I bought the herbarium 9 years ago online.  I was only  able to view about 8 different examples in the collection, but I took a leap of faith that they would all be viable and was pleasantly pleased to have all but about 5 intact.  In Dallas I could only hang 27 of them in our living room, so I was thrilled to finally have the whole collection displayed together.   I chose to hang them in frameless frames, feeling that grouping that many "frames" together would distract from the effect of them as a whole.  Thankfully,  I framed them all at the same time years ago instead of only framing the ones I  was able to use in Dallas.  That made it so much easier when it came time to hang them here!   Each plant specimen is beautiful and special, and every single one is my favorite!  Many still have faint colors from the original plant/flower.
The herbarium was expertly hung by Dan using a tape measure, laser level, a three-foot carpenter level, the "mark 1" eyeball (a military term) and countless trips up and down a ladder to get them just right.  The laser level,  measuring tape and carpenter level didn't always read the same at many checkpoints, but somehow he hung them all to specification and perfection!  The hanging took two full days over Thanksgiving one year... I didn't watch;  I was thankfully in the kitchen preparing the meal!  When he had finished hanging the last one and had me come into the room, I cried.  The house truly felt like "home" seeing the whole collection hanging in this room.
Coral pillow on sofa (cover found at the Scott Show) is made from an antique rug.
You can see the beautiful cross-bar supports on the coffee table from this angle.





Closeup of Lulu's writing about this particular specimen.  










So happy to finally show you the barn room!




140 comments:

  1. What an informative and beautiful post! Thank you for sharing your home. Everything you and Dan have done is picture perfect! Have a great weekend.

    Pam Kelley

    ReplyDelete
  2. I really enjoyed reading the details of your barn room. It's so beautiful. The history of the herbarium is wonderful and they really make a statement on the wall. I love your story about getting the clam shell. It is huge!! Thanks for sharing your beautiful room with us. Pamela

    ReplyDelete
  3. Loved your generous information and the great love you three have shared with us.

    ps Tell Ella she gave have the bear rug year round. We older girls usually get what we want!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ella was very happy to hear of the new house rule;)!

      Delete
    2. Beautiful home! Can you please tell me where you purchased the white pine floors and if they were stained before or after they were installed and what the stain color is? Thank-you.

      Delete
    3. Floor boards were purchased from a local lumber house that specializes in flooring. If you are local, you can email me for their name. The boards were stained off site, but were sealed after install. The stain formula can be found on my sidebar under "my paint and stain colors."

      Delete
  4. Joan, it is PERFECTION! You and Dan make the best team. I'm hoping that you publish a book about your house renovation, and I'll be able to say that I know them!

    ReplyDelete
  5. This room and all of it's fabulous decor is stunning. Great post. Hugs, Marty

    ReplyDelete
  6. You are so incredible to provide your readers with the details and sources!!!! Thank you, thank you! Your home is STUNNING!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thank you for generously taking the time to share all the details with us. You made my afternoon so delightful. You two have a marriage made in heaven...both so talented in a symbiotic way.
    XOXO, Victoria

    ReplyDelete
  8. There are no words for how gorgeous this room is. I was so deeply entranced in your story and pictures that I actually just snapped at my teenage for your interrupting my reading and concentration.. (oh no)

    G O R G E O U S ... simply divine!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Every detail is a work of art. What a blend of fantastic finds, your incredible eye and imagination, and an atmosphere that says "Welcome, make yourself at home."

    I could live in this room a lifetime!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Love the barn room!! Thanks for sharing it and giving us all the details on how you acquired everything. :)

    ReplyDelete
  11. I just think you are amazing. It's so obvious that you and Dan show your love for one another in building your home. Your home is your love story. *sigh* Rachel

    ReplyDelete
  12. God is in the details, for sure. I love reading the stories associated with your wonderful finds! I also love it that you have very precious items with ones found for very little. All together, your room looks like a billion!
    -Revi

    ReplyDelete
  13. Absolutely love every detail of this room! I was wondering if you might still have the name of the person in Dallas who made your slipcovers for your sofas? I live in the Dallas area and have been looking for someone who does custom slipcovers onsite and have had a hard time finding anyone. Yours are gorgeous! Thanks!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was actually the sofas that were made in Dallas and the slipcovers were made here.

      Delete
  14. As usual, I'm in awe at your attention to detail, and at how well everything blends together - from your oldest and dearest treasures to your newest (and just as dear) finds. Thank you so much for opening your heart and home and inviting all of us in.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I was admiring your ceiling in the initial post, my husband and I had just discussed installing a pine ceiling in our kitchen and family room.

    What is your recipe for white washing? I'd like to white wash our pine before it's installed. When you have a moment I'd appreciate it if you would email it to me!

    Thank you!
    Mary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mary, the formula is on my sidebar under "my paint and stain colors".

      Delete
  16. much older sister SusanJune 15, 2013 at 3:00 PM

    I am exhausted just reading all this!!! Everything is absolutely gorgeous Joanie! Doug and I can't wait to see it in person.

    love you three

    ReplyDelete
  17. Wow!! I am in love with everything about this room. Thanks so much for finally sharing it with everyone!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Everything has a story....that is how I love homes to be. I often give tours in my home and tell similar stories about each item....I hope others don't mind hearing them....thanks for sharing yours!! ~Kim

    ReplyDelete
  19. Your room---your whole house--- is perfect. Were you born with a gift to decorate (that term sounds trite for your level of artistry) or is your ability the result of study? I really want to achieve your kind of magic.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I have always had an intense interest in homes and decorating for as far back as I can remember. My sister, Susan, who you'll see around the blog as my 'much older sister Susan' has a letter that I wrote to her when I was about 9 and she was in college. I wrote in great detail about how I had just rearranged my bedroom and where I placed everything! Regrettably, I didn't follow my heart in college and majored in Advertising instead of ID. I am self taught and have been a student of decorating/design magazines, and books on design & antiques for a good 25 years! I would study magazines as if they were textbooks (single photos for hours) trying to figure out how and why a designer put an object in a certain place, or why I was so drawn to a certain room and disliked others, etc. So, to answer your very sweet question I think decorating is very innate for me, and I have also studied, though not formally.

      Delete
    2. I think you have a God given talent! I wish I could get your opinions on some of my rooms! I've tried hard, but feel like some thing isnt quite right yet.

      Delete
  20. One of the most perfect rooms I've ever seen. Every part of it looks like it's all been together as one room forever. And that's a very good thing. Just beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
  21. After reading this wonderful post with all its detail, I have decided to go back to the very beginning - to when you found your house - and I will read all of the posts and re-follow all the progress, right up to the barn room. It is a fascinating, informative, delightful and inspiring read! Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Long time reader, first time 'commenter'......I love everything you did....here and in all your other lovely rooms. The attention to detail just delights me and thank you for being so generous with your thoughts, photos and sources. Now, enjoy that wonderful room!

    ReplyDelete
  23. Sensational room!! Love it; and all the stories!

    ReplyDelete
  24. Joan,
    I will have to reread this a few times. Each detail of the room has a little story that I love hearing. You and Dan have done such a beautiful job on this room and the rest of the house. I hope you will be offered a book deal sometime, I'd love to have a coffee table book of all of your rooms and the beautiful details that create the patina that makes a home so interesting.
    xo,
    Karen

    ReplyDelete
  25. worth the wait, joan!
    absolutely incredible room. it's a joy to read how it all came to be.

    thanks for sharing, jo.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Thank you for the tour and the wonderful details! OMG! I just love this room. I would change nothing...you...are far better than any TV decorator...lol OUTSTANDING Joan

    ReplyDelete
  27. joanie this room is so Amazingly Good. wow...

    ReplyDelete
  28. Spectacular Joan (and of course Dan)!!
    Love the clamshell story and I want your coffee table!!
    Fondly-Lisa

    ReplyDelete
  29. Well, that was disappointing. *note sarcasm*

    Joan, every single part of this room is magnificent! I feel at home, and I'm not even there! What a glorious place that is so unique, yet still manages to relate to the rest of your beautiful home. Thank you so much for sharing your beautiful rooms with us, and I hope that as I go to redo my future antique home (wherever it may be), that it may convey even a fraction of the beauty and thoughtfulness of your gorgeous home.

    Tim

    ReplyDelete
  30. That was SO worth the wait! Your room is exquisite in every way! Just finished reading the details to LH...he loved it as well. Absolutely breathtaking! Thank you for heading to my pleads for the barn room post!

    ReplyDelete
  31. I can only wish to be half the decorator you are, and I do it for a living. As true as I can say, your talent for collecting, patience for the right find, and innate wisdom of placement is just incredible. I am just in love with your home. And I must admit, much as I love my guy, I've a bit of envy that the two of you share a passion for your home and the hunt for the most special pieces! You are a lucky girl in that regard :-)

    ReplyDelete
  32. Well Joan, my Love, you have out done yourself again!!!! My jaw dropped at the sight of you collection of antique herbaria! I must confess:
    I copied your Gray Owl in my kitchen
    I copied your slipcovered IKEA chairs
    I painted my planked ceiling Dove White
    I bought an antique dough bowl for my dining room table
    And last but not least...yes...I bought 3 tree fungi to display on my mantle ( my husband thinks I have officially lost my mind)
    Next on my list...a flower press to press my own local wildflowers and once again...copy Joan.
    I hope I haven't creeped you out. I'm tellin' ya...when I came across your blog 2 years ago I fell in love with your every post and my dear I am still so in love. Thank you for sharing your home! It wouldn't matter to me if you posted once every 7 months...it was worth the wait. (Please don't wait 7 months...HA!)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Stacy, your comment is hilarious. Believe me, you are not the only one who "copies" Joan.

      Delete
    2. I am a copy cat too! Unfortunately my budget is meager so I started with a collection of fish floats and little marble bird bath statues!

      Delete
    3. The Japanese fish floats are next on my list although it will take some time to fill up my dough bowl like Joan. I found a great reproduction of Joan's jade green parrots that she has in her reading room. I think I got a pair for $80...they look very similar to Joan's. Wisteria has some great knock offs that resemble many of the original antiques that Joan has throughout her house...I wonder if they copy her too!

      Delete
  33. This is my first time to comment. I am pretty new to your blog, so I am going to start over at the beginning. I am a teacher and am out for the summer, so instead of reading books, I'm going to read your entire blog! You have a beautiful beautiful home. Congratulations to you. I can tell you are a beautiful person inside and out. Thank you for your generosity in sharing your sources. I, too would love for you to publish a book.

    ReplyDelete
  34. SPECTACULAR! Full of your usual charm, texture and incredible details! Thank you for such an extensive, up-close look! I hope you're enjoying the start of a fabulous New England summer! xo!

    ReplyDelete
  35. P.S. I love that your husband just had a feeling that you were going to find something that day. Always trust those gut feelings! :)

    ReplyDelete
  36. Oh Joan, your stories of how your treasures are acquired are always so inspiring, and you and Dan are quite possibly the luckiest people I've ever met to find some of the things that you do in the trash!! What's even better is that all of these things just seem to be connected to you in someway and find you ... cause the house looks amazing and it's like they all came "home".
    xoxo,
    A

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Gail from RaleighJune 16, 2013 at 1:06 AM

      And, to top it off, they found Ella. What a love she is.

      Delete
  37. Hello, Joan!

    I love your herbarium display. In verbiage terms, our American Merriam Webster defines an herbarium as a collection of dried plant specimens. So, in our U.S., what you have here is an herbarium. And it is indeed lovely! I don't expect you to publish this comment, but I'm a copy editor by trade and wanted to note this.

    Angela

    ReplyDelete
  38. I love reading how everything came to be in your possession and why you used it in the room like you did. Is this the last room you had to finish?

    ReplyDelete
  39. Thank you for sharing all the details. What a wonderful evening I have spent enjoying your stories. After I asked you about your inspiration for the fireplace, the European fireplace look crossed my mind. As one who isn’t so great at thinking outside the box, I was imagining a rock fireplace. That is why you are the master. Love the rug. That will be on my shopping list. Whenever I look back and see the photo of Rex, I will have a bitter/sweet moment. I have to admire the way you and Dan are able to marry objects together; amazing. Love those little bronze birds, and the idea that they have just flown off the canvas; so darling. I have been a little protective of my leather chairs and the dogs, but after seeing the beautiful patina that Ella has created, I will now ease up on that. And one last thing; I have often thought I was crazy for the way I can linger over a single photo of a beautiful room for hours. No longer, I’m just in training, right?

    ReplyDelete
  40. You know what I love? I love how I feel like I get to know you and Coolio more and more as you expose the bits and pieces of your house stories! Charming doesn't even scratch the surface! I also love how you make things a base from here, an iron piece from there....

    Just love ya, Joan (and Coolio and Ella)

    ReplyDelete
  41. Thank you so much for sharing the details of your gorgeous and welcoming barn room! You and Dan really do have a magic touch. Love so many elements in the room, but mostly love how they all come together to create such a beautiful room!
    I am wondering what kind of linen (make and weight) you used for the sofa slipcovers?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is a medium weight linen, and I'm sorry I don't recall the make.

      Delete
  42. Joan, I thoroughly enjoyed your stories, especially about the giant clam shell! Your attention to detail is amazing, and very evident in your gorgeous home. As I read this post, I kept thinking, "I'll have to mention how much I like this piece" but the list kept growing. Everything is amazing. The fireplace is especially nice and you made the right choice to go with stucco. It's subtle but still commanding, and I love the wrap-around mantle. Your rugs are wonderful, the leather chair with the pillow that picks up the colors of the rug. The little birds on the mantle, the moose antler, the iron martini table with its pitting and patina ... it's all wonderful. I love how the room has so many touches of nature. It's really wonderful. You are very talented. I missed seeing Ella in your photos though! Where was she hiding?
    Claudia

    ReplyDelete
  43. It is picture perfect. and absolutely beautiful. Thanks for the details and the tour.

    ReplyDelete
  44. Of course I love the room and all your wonderful pieces, but the stories behind the pieces and their discoveries are what I adore most. Isn't blogging amazing-to tell these stories to so many others who are just as intrigued by the tale behind them.....it's a special gift!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is indeed Andrea. I am grateful to have even one person interested in the stories!

      Delete
  45. Oh How i am loving the Fireplace!!
    Daisy~

    ReplyDelete
  46. I have read and reread this post as I felt I just couldn't take it all in the first time. I gasped when I saw your giant clam shell ( I want one sooo bad) and I knew you would have a wonderful story to go with it! You have found some of the most unique pieces and at such fantastic prices! This is such a fantastic room and as with the rest of your home, I just love it! I read your reply to an earlier comment about not being trained in interior design. I truly believe that those untrained can actually be the best decorators because they decorate with their hearts and not by the so called rules. Someone out there in the publishing world should be knocking down your door to get the rights to the book about your house! I know if I bug you long enough you will eventually write one! Actually, you could just print all your blog posts and make that your book. I just love looking and studying the pictures of your rooms. I've seen your kitchen pinned a million times!! Thanks for sharing this room! It was definitely worth the wait!

    ReplyDelete
  47. Thank you for the "detail tour" of your fabulous barn room. I could sit in the room gazing at every item - the amazing herbarium but Rex is most special as well as his story! Enjoy the wonderful space in good health!
    Ann

    ReplyDelete
  48. As in all the rooms in your house, there is the collected over a lifetime look, well loved feeling. They all have stories that are waiting to be told. And I am so glad to hear you tell them. This room is so welcoming and inviting. Love it! I want to ask, have you ever stubbed your toe on the shell? ;) Thank you for sharing your home with us.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. lol...good luck! Hopefully those house angels have a barrier around it. I love that shell!

      Delete
  49. I know this post must have taken you forever to write--all the details, stories behind items, and explanations for why you chose to do something a certain way (your fireplace), they're all so specific and so thought-out. So thank you for taking the time to explain everything. We soak it all up! I showed my boys (husband & 5, 3, and 7 mo. old!) your clam shell. There were a lot of dropped jaws! Love the story behind that--you're a determined lady;) Love it. Beautiful room, wonderful stories, and a gorgeous collection of antiques. I know that not only you but people from all over the world will be "enjoying" this room for years to come:) Blessings, Joan, Dan and Ella!

    ReplyDelete
  50. Joan, I love all the details and history of this room. My husband is the second youngest of ten siblings and his mother died when he was 15, too. He and his younger sister were the only two at home then and they stayed with his dad until they got married. I am going to check your wall color out in person.

    ReplyDelete
  51. I adore every detail in the room...the color is yummmy as well!

    ReplyDelete
  52. Joan ,
    What can I say but wow and I'm not talking about just the tv either !!! The room looks great ! Hope you have a wonderful week

    ReplyDelete
  53. What I love about your sense of decorating - it's not over-wrought or junkie. So many bloggers think they have to put 'something' in/on every square inch of a room. I love your eye for detail; your desire to have each item mean something rather than just something to fill the space. When a room is full of 'stuff' I have a difficult time breathing :)

    ReplyDelete
  54. Wow! Absolutely beautiful, definitely worth the wait! I love every single detail! (I was wondering if you used a rug pad under the large jute rug?)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't Stacy. I thought I might have to add one, but the rug is so thick (heavy) that it doesn't move!

      Delete
    2. Do you mind sharing the source for your jute rug and whether you would recommend it? I am looking for a natural rug that adds that warmth and texture to a room, but with 2 active shedding dogs, I want to be practical-minded. Concerned about staining with sisal so thought jute may be softer underfoot and more forgiving with cleanup. Thoughts?

      Delete
    3. Nina, In the narrative above the third photo in this post is a link to the source, click "here" and it will open that page. I would recommend the jute or the sisal(which I have under the kitchen dining table)- both are very easy keepers and dog friendly!

      Delete
  55. Obviously, everything is beautiful but what I love most are the stories behind everything. Makes me want a story behind everything in my home. Thank you for sharing!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  56. I also have leather furniture with patina. Thank you Molly & Susie. Thank you so much for sharing your home with us. It is a delight.

    ReplyDelete
  57. Thank you for sharing the stories. It's all so interesting. I hope you have many happy and healthy years enjoying this beautiful space.

    ReplyDelete
  58. Thanks so much for taking the time to elaborate on the many beautiful items in the room...I knew those lamps on the sofa table were special....I am on the hunt now for some antique balusters!...and love the story about the clamshell!

    ReplyDelete
  59. An amazing post, Joan, just full of insights and the history behind your pieces... I think I've re-read it three times, just absorbing it all. Beautifully shared. :)
    xo Heidi

    ReplyDelete
  60. This has been well worth the wait! I absolutely LOVE everything in your house and the barn room is the cherry on top! I grew up going to antique stores, garage sales and estate sales with my parents. We spent a lot of time at Scott's since we lived in Atlanta! Now, at 31, I'm starting to collect pieces I love just like they did! We are planning a major renovation on our home in Nashville in the next 5 years or so, and I'm literally planning to meet with a designer and show them you blog. Or, your book! Can you please do a book!? Please, please!!?

    ReplyDelete
  61. Love, love, love the room!

    You have such a great collection of rugs. How do you know what rugs to buy, how much to spend and how to find them??

    I know NOTHING about rugs. The few I've run across in antique stores could have been sold at Home Depot and tea stained for all I know. Sometimes you see a rug for $175 and then you see one for $2,000. How did you learn to buy them?

    Ha, I guess that could take a whole post to answer. :) Lorrie

    ReplyDelete
  62. The whole room is beautiful, Joan. I know I'll be coming back to re-read and soak in the pictures more. I really like your advice about wrapping the mantel around the chimney. We have much the same situation with our fireplace that you see it first from the side. We are planning to go with stone (fingers crossed we can afford it) with a wood mantel (we too are fortunate to have barn beams lying around). I love how you've repurposed so many things to the property. It shows so much respect for the building and its setting. Would love to hear the saga of the floors. It sounded like they ended up being quite a project.

    ReplyDelete
  63. This room is a dream! It is gorgeous, classic and so tastefully decorated.

    Enjoy all of the hard work that went into creating this great space.

    ReplyDelete
  64. The history and details of this magnificent room are amazing, thank you so much for sharig them all. You and Dan are a fabulous team, everything you do is perfection. This is a gorgeous room but I especially love learning all the details I am sorry I have been MIA; we had houseguests and I wasn't on the computer. I am SO GLAD I didn't miss this. XO, Pinky

    ReplyDelete
  65. So gorgeous! I love all the time and thought you've put into it. Nancy

    ReplyDelete
  66. So glad you are back. I live vicariously through your beautiful decorating. What inspiration, though you're way out my league. I did go dig out a little bird I had stored and sat him on bookshelf after reading.....ahhhhhh!

    ReplyDelete
  67. Dear Joan, my wife and I like your floors a ton! We're trying to pick flooring for our "forever home" renovation. We like the look of wide plank pine, but frankly, I'm concerned about scarring, denting, and gaps between the planks (food and trash getting in between). Do you find your floors wear more than you thought they would? Less? Do you get gaps with weather changes or spilled liquid? Also, would you put pine in the kitchen? Thanks a ton ... and sorry for the litany of questions! Michael and Jess

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Michael and Jess, The flooring we added in both phases of renovation is all tongue and groove and is Eastern white pine (as that is what was original to the farmhouse.) We have not had any issues with gaps between planks, or seasonal gaps. Our boards were "seasoned" before installation (as opposed to just-cut). The mill should be able to tell you how long its been since the boards were cut. We also allowed the barn floors to acclimate in the barn room for almost two months (stacked) before installation. It is with green boards that you'll get the expansion/contraction joints. As mentioned, our floors are pine, and yes- they do dent and scratch. I had oak floors in Dallas and those also dented and scratched, but not as much as the pine. I, personally, prefer the wood pattern of the pine over the oak, so I see it as a cost/benefit situation! I think one has to be accepting of natural materials whether its marble, wood, etc. since they all have their pros and cons. But, that's the beauty of using a real/natural product- the wear and tear becomes a patina of a life lived! And, yes I would use pine in a kitchen again. Good luck with your renovation!

      Delete
  68. Oh my gosh Bonita... although I follow your blog, I have somehow missed these posts. I am so in love with your barn ... each and every detail is placed with love and great consideration, I can tell. I absolutely love the Herbarium and how expertly Dan has hung them all. This was no mean feat!! I love how you have framed them and the gentle yet powerful impact they have on the whole space. I love your coffee table, as well as the skirt of your sofa. In fact, I love everything. I love the little bronze birdies too!! Also, thank you so much for leaving a comment on my blog!! xx

    ReplyDelete
  69. What an amazing space - don't think I'd ever leave - warm, charming and inviting. I love all of the attention to detail, but after hanging a gallery wall of 9 images, I am completely enthralled with the Herbarium specimen wall...stunningly beautiful and amazing to see the impact of them hanging together...fabulous barn!!

    ReplyDelete
  70. ...rarely am i at a loss for words...spoken or written...in reading over the comments of the long awaited barn room...i find everyone has already perfectly expressed my thoughts...the room is simply beautiful...a vision fulfilled...i was so touched by your saying that you and dan would slip away and come to the house...to be alone...to dream...to be sure that this was the house that was calling you home...and...as always...i smile and think of the farmer...his life in this house...and his livelihood once living in this particular space...never could he have imagined his barn being the source of such beauty...but beautiful it is indeed...just beautiful...blessings laney

    ReplyDelete
  71. The Barn Room is fabulous! I could curl up on one of the sofas or chairs and feel right home (especially if Ella were to curl up next to me like Miss Meggie does). I wish I could say I had so many fabulous pieces of interest collected over the years. But I can live vicariously through your pictures and descriptions of your home.

    I have a couple of questions for you. Did you put any type of padding under your large jute rug? Does the rug shed? I've been looking for something that #1 won't break the bank and #2 be soft and organic looking but that doesn't shed on my hardwood floor.

    Laurie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Laurie, I do not have a pad under the rug. Before I invested in one I checked to see if it slipped at all- it did not (as I mentioned it is very thick and therefore very heavy.) The "rug" does not shed at all; however, the fringe on the rug does shed. I have days when I swear at it and think I'm going to cut it off, but I really love the extra softness (visual) and length it provides the rug, so for now, it stays;) It really is an incredible soft (to touch) and lovely rug. fyi... The company I linked to has other rugs without fringe and that are probably thinner, but I don't know how they rate in softness.

      Delete
  72. Hi Joan
    One last comment/question. Could you let me know the dimension of the individual frame of your pressed flowers. Thanks for all of the inspiration!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Stacy,
      They measure: 12" x 15-3/4"
      Now, my turn;).... why?!! :)

      Delete
    2. Well to copy you of course!!! I bid and won a smith and hawken flower press with blotting paper. I'm sure it will take years for them to age and look like the ones in your collection but my daughter and I will enjoy doing this together.

      Delete
    3. ha! silly me, but of course!!:) How fun to have a press and what a wonderful thing to do with your daughter. I love presses (I've seen some beautiful antique iron ones, and have been tempted myself;) Might I suggest;).... finding the frames first. My frames were just a bit wider than my specimens, but the frames had this neat, textural (almost burlap looking) background that worked perfectly with the colors of the pressed flowers. If you don't have a lot of specimens, consider framing them. I would use archival paper if you would like them to last 100 years (you could be someones Lulu in a hundred years;) If you want the paper to have an aged look I was thinking setting the paper (prior to adding the specimen) in the hot sun "might" age it a bit?? Also consider using antique wavy glass instead of new... that really gives the herbarium a look of authenticity. Here's a link to an old post showing another smaller collection (made by Anna Andrews in 1888) that are framed in the living room, along with two close up shots of the description of the specimen. Thought they might provide some inspiration on how you want to label them!
      http://fortheloveofahouse.blogspot.com/2009/06/mantel-love.html

      good luck with the project!

      Delete
    4. Wow! Those are really beautiful too! So sweet the way she described the pace they were picked! I will definitely do that on mine. We live in Alabama so we will have lots to pick this time of year. The colors you choose and the way you meticulously place the smalls among all of the beautiful antiques speaks to me like no other house I have ever seen. Bunny Williams said it best! I am having an affair with your house!

      Delete
  73. Gorgeous, I wouldn't be surprised to see this room in a magazine very soon. You did great Joan, you should be an interior designer...you have to touch for sure.

    ReplyDelete
  74. Joan, I am truly speechless.....enjoy!

    ReplyDelete
  75. You can do no wrong!

    Gorgeous as always!

    ReplyDelete
  76. Awesome room. A big screen TV and fireplace in one room and a wall for art: that is a great room. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  77. My husband would like nothing better than to retire to NH (the old Dartmouth thing). However I have always thought the growing season is way to short for my gardening soul. However, after viewing your post on what you have achieved, I see that life can be very very good there!

    ReplyDelete
  78. Such a warm and inviting space .... and Dan must have 'the patience of a Saint' to hang all the specimens he did. Favourite accessories are the bronze birds perched upon your mantel. So sweet. Thank you for the tour Joan. Enjoyed it immensely. -Brenda-

    ReplyDelete
  79. Lets see.....warm, creative, cozy, functional,spectacular, awesome, gorgeous, special, inviting, I am sure I could think of more:). Love the story behind all that went together to create this space!

    ReplyDelete
  80. Everything is beautiful...especially the fireplace. And..I am so grateful that you didn't put a flat screen TV over it! It appears that you found the perfect place to mount a large screen without marring any of the finer points of the room.
    BTW...just found your blog through a post on Hooked on Houses.
    Joanne

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, and thank you for letting me know how you found the blog Joanne.

      Delete
  81. Absolutely gorgeous and magazine worthy! Can you tell me about your large rug (sisal? jute?) that sits under the sofas? Size and maybe where you found it? I am looking for something similar for my living room. I swoon over your fireplace and barn door. I love how every little piece of your room has a story. What a wonderful place to be.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! If you read the copy above the third photo in this post it will give you all the info and a link for the rug. It is indeed a wonderful place to be!

      Delete
    2. Wonderful! Somehow I missed that! That is an excellent value and that 12 x 15 rug may make it into my home someday. I think I have 9 x 12 right now and it's just not making the cut size wise. You have made this a beautiful, beautiful space. And my jute rug was as heavy as a 200 lb person, so I can't imagine what that thing weighs!

      Delete
  82. I just discovered your blog and I absolutely love your tile. Every one of your rooms is beautiful, warm an welcoming. I can't stop looking at your pictures! Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  83. I am in awe of your barn room. I have had to spend maybe the last 15 minutes soaking in all the detail and beauty of it!! You are indeed a talented woman!! And, give your husband an atta boy for hanging all those pictures. I am impressed!

    ReplyDelete
  84. Have been away from blog reading for awhile... what a treat, and the stories...it's impossible to stop reading.
    Your taste, style and study of interior design is impeccable... but it is your kindness that stands out in all of your posts. This is your true success.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Colleen, Welcome back and thank you for your lovely, lovely comment. I am very touched by your kind words.

      Delete
  85. I check back from time to time to see what's going on and to catch up. I am so happy to see the barn finally complete. It's beautiful and spot on as is the rest of your home. You truly have a gift and I just hope that my decorating skills will become just as good as yours someday. I have one crazy request... Can you take a picture during the holidays/winter with a roaring fire in the fireplace;0)? Weird, huh?

    ReplyDelete
  86. I have one more question. Where did you purchase the fabrics for the sofa cushions? They're beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I assume you are asking about the velvet sofa cushions? I purchased those locally (in Boston and New Hampshire). I don't have fabric names for them, sorry.

      Delete
  87. This room is beautiful!! Would you mind sharing what brand your leather chairs are? They look gorgeous and the leather seems to be aging really well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm sorry, I purchased the chairs 12 years ago, and I no longer remember the brand.

      Delete
  88. Did you find a good source for the clipless picture frames? Your home is lovely at Christmas also. I love the simplicity with which you decorate for the holiday. It has inspired me to ease off on the decor next year. Less is more as your room shows. Do you do a tree?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I bought the clip frames from Ikea years ago, they have since been discontinued. I haven't looked in several years- perhaps they carry something similar now? No, we don't do a tree.

      Delete
  89. Joan, I think I've read this post on your barn room at least 20 times. It gets better every time I see it. Thank you so much for sharing this room & the rest of your home with all of us. Do you recall where you found the coral velvet for your pillows? I just bought an old rug pillow at Scott's with coral in it & now I need more pillows to go with it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Terri, I found the velvet at a fabric shop in New Hampshire. It has been over a year and a half since I purchased it. If you send me your email I will stop in the next time I am in that town and see if they still have it, and let you know

      Delete
  90. Joan, It is so nice of you to offer to check on the fabric for me. I've looked in most of the fabric stores in the Atlanta/ Marietta area & can't find anything that seems quite right. My email address is phil_biggers@bellsouth.net.

    Thanks,
    Terri

    ReplyDelete
  91. I believe more than the story of your building a home, the atmosphere reflects the fortunate beauty of having a very loving husband alongside. Rare and precious.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Indeed it is and I am grateful everyday for his love and friendship.

      Delete
  92. Ok so, I came across a picture of your barn room today and decided to head over and read through your post again. It is all just so wonderful; I too have some tears in my eyes reading about yours as you saw the herbarium. I am so glad yall have chosen to share these stories with all of us as it has been a pleasure to see you make this house your own.
    Cali

    ReplyDelete
  93. Lovely. Where did you purchase the neutral rug from?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. rug link
      http://www.homedecorators.com/detail.php?sku=7188535820

      Delete
  94. Hello, I stumbled upon your beautiful living room while searching for an affordable rug. I just placed my order and cannot wait. thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  95. this post is great and answered so many questions i had while looking at your photos - and mainly the "herbarium" so beautiful, unique, wonderful, magical - ...love it all. You are so talented when it comes to designing rooms.

    ReplyDelete
  96. The painting over the fireplace is so peaceful. Who is the artist? Do you know what it is called? It's the perfect choice for the room!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. I talk about the painting in this post. No, the painting does not have a name.

      Delete
  97. Your house is simply beautiful. Every inch is stunning. Thank you for sharing the details.
    Would you mind sharing what brand/color your faux fur throws are?
    Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you . I found them at Home Goods and they are by Tahari Home. I am guessing they are supposed to be a brown "bear."

      Delete
  98. Hi there,

    I just stumbled upon your blog and home and starte following you on Instagram. I am a school teacher in California with a heart for home. As I get on little ventures to decorate and grow in my own form of design, your home has really taken my heart by storm. I join lots of other copy cats that are inspired by your talent and generous heart in sharing your space so intimately.
    I was wondering if you had a close up of the painting over the fireplace? It reminds me so very much of something I had seen as a child. Not sure if you have a link to it elsewhere...just thought I would ask:)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Angie, Welcome! Thank you for your very sweet comment. I'm happy you found me!
      I don't have a closeup of the painting, but if you email me I will send you a close up. j.
      fortheloveofahouse@comcast.net

      Delete

Welcome! Thank you for leaving a comment; you have no idea how much your comments inspire me to keep writing- I appreciate each and every one.

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...